Best single-board computer

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thermoplastics
Anto Prijosoesilo
Ryan
Wernight
Stuart Kearney
HardwareHero
Endi Sukaj
Laura Kyle
Jonathan
Andris Pelcbergs
Mathew Bauler
130 contributors
Up to date as of
After considering 27 Single-board computers, the Slant community recommends Raspberry Pi 3 Model B for being the best option for hobbyists, Udoo x86 Ultra for versatility and C.H.I.P. for being the best learning platform. These recommendations are the result of hundreds of contributions from the Slant community.
96
Slant Score

Best for hobbyists

Raspberry Pi 3 Model B

Raspberry Pi is the most recognizable name in the single board computer niche. Raspberry Pi boards are the most popular, having the largest following and the most active community. This makes them a good choice for people who want to set up a project as a hobby and for first-timers, because there are more available software and project guides that require a Raspberry Pi than all of the other SBCs combined.

Available on Amazon
Available on Amazon
Release date
February 2016
CPU
1.2GHz 64-bit quad-core ARM Cortex-A53
RAM
1GB 900MHz
Storage
microSD
GPU
Broadcom video core 4
Setup complexity
Computing power
Support and documentation
External connectivity
GPIO functionality

The largest and most active community

Raspberry Pi has the largest following of any single-board computer. The amount of guides, tutorials and software available for the Raspberry Pi is unmatched by any other competitor. A regular user has close to no chance to run into a problem that hasn’t been covered already. If a web search doesn’t yield any results, the users on the official forums are very responsive and will usually reply within a day.

Can be turned into a fully-functional multimedia center

You can easily turn any Raspberry Pi into a fully functional home media streaming station with its ability to stream 60Hz Full HD videos. You just have to hook the Model B up to a Full HD monitor (through an HDMI cable), decent speakers (the Bluetooth 4.1 connectivity will allow the use of the wireless ones). Then download applications (Netflix, YouTube, Spotify, and Kodi for example are all supported out of the box) and your home multimedia station is ready. Once built, you can even control the media station using an Android or iOS app.

Great legacy gaming support

Raspberry Pi 3 Model B can be also be used as a console emulator using an OS image called RetroPie. Setting up RetroPie the first time will only take about 30 minutes on average for someone who has never done it before, and even less for experienced users. You can emulate various platforms ranging from early ‘80s legacy consoles like the NES, to more recent ones like the Wii and PlayStation Portable.

No built-in storage

Unlike Udoo or C.H.I.P, the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B has no integrated storage. An SD card must be used as a storage.

Other things to note

Comes with built-in Wireless LAN and Bluetooth 4.1. Has 40 GPIO pins. Has an official Debian-based image which is supported by the company and the community alongside several other Linux distributions and Android which can be easily installed and has a dedicated app store with hundreds of applications available. It does get hot pretty quickly while doing some “intensive” computing however, and the ARM-based CPU may be a problem when trying to run some applications or games.

Shepp
January 9, 2016

I bought my first Raspberry Pi without any clear idea on what I was going to do with it. The amount of projects people have done with a simple Raspberry Pi is mind-blowing. Unfortunately I haven’t done anything more complex than setting up a home server with my Pi but I am definitely going to do some cool projects in the future when I get some time. I remember a video on YouTube where some guy had built an arcade machine using a Raspberry Pi. Amazing!

89
Slant Score

Most versatile

Udoo x86 Ultra

The Ultra is comparable in power to that of a typical budget PC. It can run most applications you would usually run on a PC on a daily basis, even some 3D games. It supports Linux, Android, and Windows 10. And it has an embedded Arduino 101 board with built-in gyroscope and six-axis accelerometer. The high power and customizability offered by the Arduino board make this SBC an extremely versatile tool for casual and power users alike.

Available on UDOO
Available on UDOO
Release date
November 2016
CPU
2.56GHz Intel Pentium N3713 (quad-core)
RAM
8GB DDR3L
Storage
32 GB eMMC (embedded MicroMediaCard)
GPU
Intel HD Graphics 405
Setup complexity
Computing power
Support and documentation
External connectivity
GPIO functionality

Capable of running as a day-to-day PC

With 8 GB of RAM and a 2.6 GHz quad-core Intel CPU, the Udoo x86 Ultra is capable of running most applications an average user would need on a daily basis without any particular problems. You can run an office suite, web browser, or an IDE the same way you would in a normal PC. It can also run some PC games such as DotA, League of Legends and Team Fortress 2 on 720p at 20-30 frames per second.

Great media streaming potential

The relatively high power makes the Udoo x86 Ultra the best single-board computer for high-quality media streaming. It can stream 60Hz 4K video on up to three monitors through HDMI and two mini display ports. This opens the doors for setting up a UHD capable media station. Applications like Netflix, Spotify, Kodi, YouTube, etc. are also supported, as Udoo x86 can run operating systems which support these applications.

Best storage capabilities

In terms of storage the Udoo x86 is a clear winner. Out of the box it comes with 32GB eMMC (embedded MultiMediaCard, basically a built-in SSD).Then it’s fully up to the user to upgrade the storage as they see fit. If you need fast (but expensive) storage—an SSD is the best option. If you just need a large, inexpensive storage space, a regular HDD will do. A microSD card can also be used as a storage option.

Poor wireless connectivity

Udoo x86 has no integrated hardware to connect to Wi-Fi or Bluetooth networks. You have to buy an additional wireless antenna ($14.90) and use the only M.2 slot in order to connect to wireless networks.

Other things to note

Supports RetroPie so it can be used as a retro gaming emulator. Has great documentation and guides available online and the community is quite helpful even if a bit small. It’s very expensive though, at least as far as single-board computers go. It’s priced at $259.

BarretP
November 21, 2016

I wanted to build a DIY smart home automation system and I had used multiple Raspberry Pis for various projects through the years so it was logical that I would try a Raspberry Pi for this project as well. Unfortunately the Pi 2 Model B was not up to the task and was rather slow. So I decided to use something else instead. That’s where I stumbled upon the Udoo x86 Ultra. The specs seemed amazing even though the price was a bit steep compared to a Pi. But I got one anyways and it worked just as promised! The home automation system is close to done and works great (I just need to find a way to make voice recognition work) and in no small part thanks to the Udoo board.

88
Slant Score

Best learning platform

C.H.I.P.

Priced at just $9, CHIP is the cheapest SBCs on the market. It comes with a pre-installed Debian-based operating system so there’s no setup required out-of-the-box. The official documentation is very well organized and covers pretty much all aspects the user will need. Cheap and easy to use, it’s a perfect choice for those who are looking for a simple development environment to learn how to program or how to set up a single-board computer.

Available on Next Thing Co.
Available on Next Thing Co.
Release date
May 2016
CPU
1GHz ARM R8
RAM
500 MB
Storage
4GB internal storage
GPU
Mali 400
Setup complexity
Computing power
Support and documentation
External connectivity
GPIO functionality

Very cheap

At only $9, it’s the cheapest single-board computer on the market. This makes it perfect for a “first time purchase” as you won’t be investing a large amount of money in something you aren’t sure how you'll use.

Ready out-of-the-box

Unlike many single-board computers that require an operating system installation from scratch, CHIP comes with an OS preinstalled and ready to go. It’s a Debian Linux derivative and it’s quite easy to use even for someone who has never used Linux before. It also comes with a lot of applications installed such as a web browser and a text editor. It even has a programming language installed called Scratch, which is aimed for beginners.

Great as a learning platform

The official documentation available for CHIP is easy to read and outstandingly informative. You can learn how to use the CHIP and perform different tasks with it through the documentation alone. For example, the documentation fully covers the GPIO pin use. As previously mentioned, it comes with the Scratch programming language, which (admittedly) is aimed at helping children learn how to program but it’s useful even for grown-ups who want to learn how to program. If Scratch is too easy, installing a full-featured, true programming language like Python is very easy.

Slow and sluggish performance

Given its price point, the C.H.I.P. simply cannot handle high performance applications. For example, while streaming Full HD videos, the frame rate is incapable of reaching the comfortable 25-30 Hz range. Due to its low processing potential, CHIP has limited application amplitude

Other things to note

CHIP has built-in Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, and 4 GB flash storage. It can also run without a monitor and can be controlled through a PC or laptop by connecting it via microUSB. Unfortunately, it is currently difficult to buy a CHIP since they are consistently out of stock due to high demand. You need to be patient before you can purchase one of these.

Jordan83
January 6, 2017

My 10-year-old son got interested in programming so I decided to make it even more fun for him (and me!) I bought a CHIP board for just $9 and helped him set it up for the first time. It works wonderfully for learning a programming language (I am currently teaching him Python.) Unfortunately it does not do any complex computing, but it’s decent enough for text editing and browsing the web, although it does get sluggish on some JS-heavy websites. But for a fun project and learning platform, it’s a great choice.

What others are saying

Here are some of the best reviews from around the web on Single-board computers.

How they compare

When picking the best Single-board computer for you, the Slant community thinks you should consider the following criteria: Setup complexity, Computing power, and Support and documentation.
Setup complexity
Initial setup for a single-board computer must be as easy and smooth as possible. If the SBC does not come with an OS pre-installed, then installing the operating system for the first time must be quick and straightforward. Minimal tinkering on the hardware side is also preferred, most of the time, you will only need to hook up a monitor through an HDMI cable and a mouse plus a keyboard through USB ports.
C.H.I.P.
    • There’s virtually no setup needed. It comes with an operating system preinstalled so there’s no need to do anything from the software side. You just need to plug it into a monitor and connect a keyboard and mouse and it’s ready to go. It even has some basic applications (like a web browser) already installed.
    Raspberry Pi 3 Model B
      • Setting up a Raspberry Pi is easy enough even for people who have not installed an OS before. The official documentation is very detailed in explaining how to install the official Raspberry Pi OS, called Raspbian and even a beginner can follow it without a problem.
      • Doesn’t have a built-in storage so you need to get an SD card or external hard drive before setting it up.
    Udoo x86 Ultra
      • It’s absolutely straightforward to set up. The installation guides for all supported operating systems are provided in written and video form.
      Computing power
      This basically boils down to: what’s the most advanced thing a single-board computer can do? The ability to function as a daily PC is one way to measure single-board computers, even if they will not be used for that purpose most of the time, it’s still a good way to get a rough idea on how powerful a single-board computer is without getting too much into the technical details.
      Udoo x86 Ultra
        • Can stream 4K videos at 60 Hz and to three monitors at the same time. This is something no other single-board computer currently on the market can do.

        • Can play some modern games like Team Fortress 2, Dota 2 and League of Legends at 30 FPS. More demanding games are also technically supported, but have such a low framerate that they’re virtually unplayable.

        • Supports RetroPie and can emulate consoles from retro ones up to newer ones like the Playstation 2 and PSP.

        Raspberry Pi 3 Model B
          • The Raspberry Pi can do most daily activities without any major issues. Browsing the web, checking the email and editing text is not a problem at all. It can also stream Full HD videos at 60 FPS.

          • The Raspberry Pi 3 Model B can emulate retro consoles (and some newer ones) through RetroPie. Games played with RetroPie can usually be played at 30-60 FPS.

          • While still a very powerful single-board computer, it’s not as powerful as some other SBCs. For example, it has some problems with streaming 4K videos; and even at Full HD, it has problems with YouTube. It is also unable to run newer games even if they are not very demanding such as Team Fortress 2 or DotA.
        C.H.I.P.
          • You can complete some basic tasks with CHIP. Things like browsing the web, editing text, or streaming 720p videos can be done without any hassle.
          • Anything other than simple tasks is virtually impossible. Streaming Full HD videos can only be done at 3-5 FPS and console emulation is not possible, at least not at a playable framerate.
        Computing power Specs
        Raspberry Pi 3 Model B
        Udoo x86 Ultra
        C.H.I.P.
        CPU
        Central processing unit speed and type.
        1.2GHz 64-bit quad-core ARM Cortex-A53
        2.56GHz Intel Pentium N3713 (quad-core)
        1GHz ARM R8
        Raspberry Pi 3 Model B
        1.2GHz 64-bit quad-core ARM Cortex-A53
        Udoo x86 Ultra
        2.56GHz Intel Pentium N3713 (quad-core)
        C.H.I.P.
        1GHz ARM R8
        RAM
        1GB 900MHz
        8GB DDR3L
        500 MB
        Raspberry Pi 3 Model B
        1GB 900MHz
        Udoo x86 Ultra
        8GB DDR3L
        C.H.I.P.
        500 MB
        Storage
        The type of storage used.
        microSD
        32 GB eMMC (embedded MicroMediaCard)
        4GB internal storage
        Raspberry Pi 3 Model B
        microSD
        Udoo x86 Ultra
        32 GB eMMC (embedded MicroMediaCard)
        C.H.I.P.
        4GB internal storage
        GPU
        The type of GPU used
        Broadcom video core 4
        Intel HD Graphics 405
        Mali 400
        Raspberry Pi 3 Model B
        Broadcom video core 4
        Udoo x86 Ultra
        Intel HD Graphics 405
        C.H.I.P.
        Mali 400
        GPIO (general-purpose input/output)
        The number of pins used on the GPIO
        40 pins
        28 pins
        Up to 45 GPIO pins
        Raspberry Pi 3 Model B
        40 pins
        Udoo x86 Ultra
        28 pins
        C.H.I.P.
        Up to 45 GPIO pins
        Specific GPIO
        The type of GPIO's in use.
        IIC, SPI, UART, IIS (audio)
        IIC, UART, LPC (Low Pin Count bus), SDIO (Secure Digital Input/Output)
        IIC, UART, 1-Wire, SPI, CSI
        Raspberry Pi 3 Model B
        IIC, SPI, UART, IIS (audio)
        Udoo x86 Ultra
        IIC, UART, LPC (Low Pin Count bus), SDIO (Secure Digital Input/Output)
        C.H.I.P.
        IIC, UART, 1-Wire, SPI, CSI
        Support and documentation
        Technical support and good documentation are crucial for every electronic device and single-board computers are no exception. The official documentation must be complete and must explain everything in such a way that even non-technical people understand it. There should also be a healthy community following a single-board community—the larger the better. A good community means more guides, tutorials, and more help for anyone should the need arise.
        Raspberry Pi 3 Model B
          • Raspberry Pi has the largest following of any other single-board computer. The amount of guides, tutorials and software available for the Raspberry Pi is simply unmatched by any other competitor. A regular user is extremely unlikely to run into a problem that hasn’t been covered already. If a web search doesn’t yield any results, the users on the official forums are very responsive and will usually reply within a day.

          • The official documentation available at the official website is very well structured and covers pretty much all of the aspects a typical Raspberry Pi 3 user will require.

          C.H.I.P.
            • Released just last May 2016, the CHIP already has a strong, growing community. More than 39,000 backers pledged more than $2,000,000 to help bring the CHIP project to life. The official forum is growing in activity, with about 64 topics posted per week. On average, new topics get multiple replies within the first couple of hours, the community is very active and responsive. Even older topics stay up to date.

            • The official documentation for CHIP is brilliant. The documentation is complete, well-structured, and easy to read. People generally new to SBCs will find the documentation extremely helpful, as it not only covers pretty much everything the regular user would run into, but it is also written in a very straightforward way.

            Udoo x86 Ultra
              • The Udoo x86 community is small as it’s just off from the Kickstarter. Not many people have their boards yet, but the fact that Udoo raised over $800,000 at Kickstarter sounds promising. The official forum seems fairly active with an average of 200 views and 5 replies per discussion.
              • Even through the community is growing, the product is not considered mainstream. When purchasing this SBC, you should be aware that some tinkering will be required. Prolific users will also most likely run into some sort of problem that might not have yet been discussed on official resources.

              • The official documentation available at the official website is lacking. Apart from the hardware specification sheet, there’s generally not much information or project examples available for the Udoo x86 at the moment. The users will have a lot of tinkering and hacking to do if they want to achieve any positive results with their projects.

            External connectivity
            A good SBC should have decent connectivity with external devices. The number and types of ports are important here as well as support for Wi-Fi or Bluetooth.
            Raspberry Pi 3 Model B
              • The Raspberry Pi Model 3 has an onboard 2.4 GHz 802.11n Wi-Fi which works out of the box, as long as the latest version of the default operating system is installed.

              • The Model 3 B has built-in Bluetooth support. This is very helpful when connecting multiple peripherals or if you’ve run out of USB ports to connect to.

              • Wired connectivity is pretty complete as well. Users will get four USB 2.0 ports, HDMI, Ethernet, a 3.5mm audio jack, CSI (camera interface), and DSI (display interface).

              Udoo x86 Ultra
                • For wired connectivity, the Udoo x86 stands out: It has three USB 3.0 ports, a SATA connector, M.2 slot, microSD slot, Ethernet, HDMI, two DisplayPort connectors, and even an IR RC5 interface. This is on par with what regular desktop computers require.
                • The Udoo x86 Ultra does not have Wi-Fi or Bluetooth out of the box. However, it has an M.2 slot where an officially supported antenna module can be mounted. This module provides 803.11n Wireless LAN and 5 GHz Bluetooth 4.2 at for $15. Unfortunately, attaching the antenna will occupy the M.2 slot which could have been used for an SSD instead.
              C.H.I.P.
                • The C.H.I.P shines in terms of wireless connectivity. The tiny $9 SBC comes with Bluetooth 4.0 and 803.11 b/g/n Wireless LAN built in.
                • Wired connectivity is sadly lacking. With only one USB and one micro USB port available. In order to attach a mouse and keyboard, you will have to buy an additional powered USB hub. The video output is initially a TRRS connector, while optional VGA or HDMI connectors will cost an additional $10 and $15 respectively. The audio output is streamed through an on-board 3.5mm TRS plug. It also lacks an ethernet port.
              External connectivity Specs
              Raspberry Pi 3 Model B
              Udoo x86 Ultra
              C.H.I.P.
              Power
              800mA at 5V, however 2,5A is unofficially recommended
              3000mA at 12V power supply provided
              500mA at 5V (recommended 2000mA)
              Raspberry Pi 3 Model B
              800mA at 5V, however 2,5A is unofficially recommended
              Udoo x86 Ultra
              3000mA at 12V power supply provided
              C.H.I.P.
              500mA at 5V (recommended 2000mA)
              USB
              Four 2.0 USB ports
              Three 3.0 USB ports
              Single USB port
              Raspberry Pi 3 Model B
              Four 2.0 USB ports
              Udoo x86 Ultra
              Three 3.0 USB ports
              C.H.I.P.
              Single USB port
              Video
              15pin MIPI camera interface connector, HDMI (FHD), MIPI display interface, TRRS connector
              One HDMI, Two mini display ports (all support UHD)
              Single TRRS (Tip-Ring-Ring-Sleeve) connector restricted to 640x480 pixel resolution, optional VGA or HDMI extension board available
              Raspberry Pi 3 Model B
              15pin MIPI camera interface connector, HDMI (FHD), MIPI display interface, TRRS connector
              Udoo x86 Ultra
              One HDMI, Two mini display ports (all support UHD)
              C.H.I.P.
              Single TRRS (Tip-Ring-Ring-Sleeve) connector restricted to 640x480 pixel resolution, optional VGA or HDMI extension board available
              Audio
              3.5mm jack
              Combined microphone and headphone connector
              3.5mm TRS audio plug
              Raspberry Pi 3 Model B
              3.5mm jack
              Udoo x86 Ultra
              Combined microphone and headphone connector
              C.H.I.P.
              3.5mm TRS audio plug
              Network
              The type of network availible in the device.
              Ethernet, 8.2.11n Wi-Fi, Bluetooth 4.1,
              Ethernet, optional Bluetooth 4.0; optional 803.11n Wireless LAN
              Bluetooth 4.0, 803.11 b/g/n Wireless LAN, optional USB-Ethernet
              Raspberry Pi 3 Model B
              Ethernet, 8.2.11n Wi-Fi, Bluetooth 4.1,
              Udoo x86 Ultra
              Ethernet, optional Bluetooth 4.0; optional 803.11n Wireless LAN
              C.H.I.P.
              Bluetooth 4.0, 803.11 b/g/n Wireless LAN, optional USB-Ethernet
              GPIO (general-purpose input/output)
              The number of pins used on the GPIO
              40 pins
              28 pins
              Up to 45 GPIO pins
              Raspberry Pi 3 Model B
              40 pins
              Udoo x86 Ultra
              28 pins
              C.H.I.P.
              Up to 45 GPIO pins
              Specific GPIO
              The type of GPIO's in use.
              IIC, SPI, UART, IIS (audio)
              IIC, UART, LPC (Low Pin Count bus), SDIO (Secure Digital Input/Output)
              IIC, UART, 1-Wire, SPI, CSI
              Raspberry Pi 3 Model B
              IIC, SPI, UART, IIS (audio)
              Udoo x86 Ultra
              IIC, UART, LPC (Low Pin Count bus), SDIO (Secure Digital Input/Output)
              C.H.I.P.
              IIC, UART, 1-Wire, SPI, CSI
              GPIO functionality
              Some DIY projects (especially projects that have to deal with automation) will require some sort of interface with the outside world. This is where general-purpose input/output (GPIO) pins shine. GPIO pins can be used to connect environmental sensors to the board or even output devices such as LED lights. While discussing the GPIO capabilities the rule of thumb is: more is better.
              C.H.I.P.
                • Has a total of 45 GPIO pins, which is more than the typical SBC.

                • Multiple standard communication protocols are also available, as an example: IIC, UART, 1-Wire, SPI, and CSI. Just like with Raspberry Pi, the IIC and SPI buses can be used to connect CHIP to external ADC’s (analog-to-digital converters) and DAC’s (digital-to-analog converters) in order to read and write analog signals to external hardware (sensors and actuators, for example).

                Raspberry Pi 3 Model B
                  • The Raspberry Pi 3 model B offers 40 GPIO pins to be used within their projects. This is a very reasonable number of pins for most projects that will need them.

                  • The special communication protocols officially supported are the following: IIC (Inter-Integrated Circuit), SPI (Serial Peripheral Interface) and UART (Universal Asynchronous Receiver-Transmitter). The GPIO functionality explained above allows the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B to be connected with various peripheral devices and, as a result expands the functionality of the board. For example, IIC and SPI buses can be used for attaching multiple analog to digital converters which can be used to “read” analog channels like thermal sensors, humidity sensors, CO2 sensors, etc. Meanwhile UART can be used for communication between multiple Raspberry Pi’s.

                  Udoo x86 Ultra
                    • The Udoo x86 Ultra comes with 28 GPIO ports in total which may seem small, but considering the fact that it has an Arduino 101 embedded inside, it’s actually a decent amount. The Arduino board has built-in functionality for what some of the pins would be used (like a six-axis accelerometer and gyroscope) and adds 12 additional GPIO pins.

                    • Several key communication protocols are also supported: two IIC, two UART, LPC and SDIO.

                    GPIO functionality Specs
                    Raspberry Pi 3 Model B
                    Udoo x86 Ultra
                    C.H.I.P.
                    GPIO (general-purpose input/output)
                    The number of pins used on the GPIO
                    40 pins
                    28 pins
                    Up to 45 GPIO pins
                    Raspberry Pi 3 Model B
                    40 pins
                    Udoo x86 Ultra
                    28 pins
                    C.H.I.P.
                    Up to 45 GPIO pins
                    Specific GPIO
                    The type of GPIO's in use.
                    IIC, SPI, UART, IIS (audio)
                    IIC, UART, LPC (Low Pin Count bus), SDIO (Secure Digital Input/Output)
                    IIC, UART, 1-Wire, SPI, CSI
                    Raspberry Pi 3 Model B
                    IIC, SPI, UART, IIS (audio)
                    Udoo x86 Ultra
                    IIC, UART, LPC (Low Pin Count bus), SDIO (Secure Digital Input/Output)
                    C.H.I.P.
                    IIC, UART, 1-Wire, SPI, CSI
                    Other Specs
                    Specs
                    Raspberry Pi 3 Model B
                    Udoo x86 Ultra
                    C.H.I.P.
                    Release date
                    February 2016
                    November 2016
                    May 2016
                    Raspberry Pi 3 Model B
                    February 2016
                    Udoo x86 Ultra
                    November 2016
                    C.H.I.P.
                    May 2016
                    96
                    Slant Score
                    96
                    Slant Score
                    Best for hobbyists
                    Raspberry Pi 3 Model B
                    Available on Amazon
                    89
                    Slant Score
                    89
                    Slant Score
                    Most versatile
                    Udoo x86 Ultra
                    Available on UDOO
                    88
                    Slant Score
                    88
                    Slant Score
                    Best learning platform
                    C.H.I.P.
                    Available on Next Thing Co.
                    Other products we considered
                    Check some of the 27 other products our community recommends.
                    Community Discussion
                    Have a question about picking the the best Single-board computer? Ask Anto Prijosoesilo, Matt Jani and the 128 other Slant community enthusiasts that contributed to this guide.
                    What additional peripheral hardware is usually required in order to run a SBC?

                    Most of the time you will need to have a mouse, keyboard and a monitor. Sometimes a DC power supply cord will also be required.

                    Ryan's avatar
                    Ryan
                    Linux is very commonly used as an OS for a SBC, is it worth trying Linux based SBC without any previous experience with Linux?

                    Sure. Actually, a Linux based SBC is very convenient tool in learning the basics of Linux before trying it on your desktop computer.

                    Ryan's avatar
                    Ryan
                    In general, how is the SBC loaded with an OS, and does it require any particular skillset?

                    It strongly depends on the SBC. Some SBCs even come with preloaded OS (C.H.I.P. for example). If the OS is not preloaded, well, it will mainly require the user to follow very detailed step by step guides, which are provided by the manufacturer as well as by the community most of the time so no particular skillset will be involved there.

                    Aubrey's avatar
                    Aubrey
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